ACRES OF DIAMONDS PDF

adminComment(0)

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Acres of Diamonds, by Russell H. Conwell This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no. Free site book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. The “Acres of Diamonds” which I have mentioned through so many years are to diamonds he could download a whole county, and with a mine of diamonds he.


Acres Of Diamonds Pdf

Author:TALISHA CENTRICH
Language:English, French, German
Country:Bosnia Herzegovina
Genre:Art
Pages:216
Published (Last):20.06.2016
ISBN:660-9-70443-977-8
ePub File Size:25.37 MB
PDF File Size:19.49 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:25604
Uploaded by: MILLARD

Acres of Diamonds. Russell H. Conwell. I am astonished that so many people should care to hear this story over again. Indeed, this lecture has become a study . Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell. Adobe PDF icon. Download this document as catchhifmatersdo.ml: File size: MB What's this? light bulb idea Many people prefer. Adrian P. Cooper. Author of: Our Ultimate Reality. Life, the Universe and the Destiny of Mankind Acres of Dia Tüfek, Mikrop ve Çelik - Jared Diamond.

The first farmer had owned, free and clear … acres of diamonds. But he had sold them for practically nothing, in order to look for them elsewhere. The moral is clear: If the first farmer had only taken the time to study and prepare himself to learn what diamonds looked like in their rough state, and to thoroughly explore the property he had before looking elsewhere, all of his wildest dreams would have come true. The thing about this story that has so profoundly affected millions of people is the idea that each of us is, at this very moment, standing in the middle of our own acres of diamonds.

Before you go running off to what you think are greener pastures, make sure that your own is not just as green or perhaps even greener. A man I knew in Arizona began with a small gas station. It dawned upon him that the man had money in his pockets and there were things he needed or wanted that he would pay for if they were conveniently displayed where he could see them. So he began adding things.

Fishing tackle, then fishing licenses, hunting and camping equipment, rifles, shot guns, ammunition, hunting licenses. He found an excellent line of aluminum fishing boats and trailers. He began downloading up the contiguous property around him. Then he added an auto parts department. He always sold cold soft drinks and candy, but now he added an excellent line of chocolates in a refrigerated case.

Before long, he sold more chocolates than anyone else in the state. He carried thousands of things his customers could download while waiting for their cars to be serviced. All the products he sold also guaranteed that most of the gas customers in town would come to his station. He sold more gas. He began cashing checks on Friday, and his sales grew.

It all started with a man with a human brain watching a customer standing around with money in his pockets and nothing to spend it on. Others would have lived and died with the small service station, and they do. My friend saw the diamonds. Many service station operators, upon seeing a wealthy customer drive in, might say to themselves, I ought to be in his business.

Not so. Take the time to stand off and look at your work as a stranger might and ask, Why does he do it that way? A rut, remember, is really nothing more than a grave with the ends kicked out. Some of the most interesting businesses in the world grew out of what was originally a very small idea in a very small area.

Do you know all there is to know about your work? Would you call yourself a first-class professional at your work? Return to Book Page. Preview — Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. In Acres of Diamonds , Russell Conwell shows success is a spiritual idea--the result of spiritual principles. Though not a "get rich guide," Conwell's book shows how to find a fortune-if you know where to look.

There are as many opportunities for success today as in Conwell's time, if not more so, because they are found first and foremost in one's own conscience. Through hi In Acres of Diamonds , Russell Conwell shows success is a spiritual idea--the result of spiritual principles.

Through his ministry and philosophy that "all good things are possible," Conwell opened the doors of opportunity for untold millions. Acres of Diamonds echoes his core belief-that each of us is placed here on earth for the primary purpose of helping others.

Conwell was a minister, the founder of Temple University, and two hospitals where no one was ever turned away for lack of money. He was also a famous lecturer. In his lecture, the story is told of a man who sells his farm to travel far and wide in search of diamonds. There is a moral to the story in Acres of Diamonds , a story which Conwell presented as a lecture more than 6, and to untold numbers of people.

Get A Copy. Paperback , 68 pages. Published July 1st by Waking Lion Press first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Acres of Diamonds , please sign up. Customize You can't read books here - Goodreads is for keeping track of what you've read and what you want to read.

Acres of diamonds pdf download

See 2 questions about Acres of Diamonds…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. Sort order. Aug 15, Chris Munson rated it really liked it Shelves: Based on a speech originally given as a lecture to raise money for what would become Temple University, this parable about seeing the riches around you can help give you a new perspective. Short and powerful the book is much like "Who Moved My Cheese" in that it is brief, but contains an important lesson told in the form of a story "Acres of Diamonds" will force you to take a new look at your own backyard when looking for opportunity.

The basic story revolves around a Persian farmer who loses Based on a speech originally given as a lecture to raise money for what would become Temple University, this parable about seeing the riches around you can help give you a new perspective. The basic story revolves around a Persian farmer who loses his life and significant wealth looking for a mine of diamonds when, ironically, his own farm land which he sold to finance his search for diamonds literally contained acres of diamonds.

Conwell gives several other examples of similar stories revolving around gold, oil, etc. The grass isn't always greener on the other side Rambles a bit, but it's still a great story with a timeless message. View 2 comments. Aug 25, David rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a small book with a large message that could potentially have an enormous impact on the reader with the 'ears to hear' it and the will to internalize it and put it into action in his or her life every day.

The greatness that exists within every one of us does not exist in any external form whatsoever. Rather, it exists within us When used for the good of others and not for reasons of selfish gain, we discover that we, also, have more than we need; This is a small book with a large message that could potentially have an enormous impact on the reader with the 'ears to hear' it and the will to internalize it and put it into action in his or her life every day.

When used for the good of others and not for reasons of selfish gain, we discover that we, also, have more than we need; of contentment, of happiness and, yes, of wealth also.

As we like to say in my household, "Change your mind, change your life. May 29, Tori Miller rated it did not like it Shelves: I wish I could remember what caused me to download this book over 10 years ago. I have been taking it with me through 6 moves, and I finally read it last night. Maybe it is the original prosperity gospel. I have never read so much bs in so few pages.

I have never done this with a book before but I am throwing it in the trash. Mar 03, Ian Connel rated it it was ok. There are some good values in Acres of Diamonds, but a pastor who argues that "poverty is the result of God's opinion of those people" and "rich men are the most honest men" is unbelievably misled. For one, does he know Jesus led a life of poverty, serving the poor? And for two, has he ever heard of advertising?

If only he had any clue that many businesses would depend on, and thrive on, using fear and false information to sell things that nobody actually needs. In fairness, I made it through ab There are some good values in Acres of Diamonds, but a pastor who argues that "poverty is the result of God's opinion of those people" and "rich men are the most honest men" is unbelievably misled.

Mar 20, Ayodele added it. Book teaches: Prosper where you are there is a veritable gold mine where you are NOW, find it. Great men are often plain men. Greatness does not come by gaining some "important" office. Figure out what people want and then give it to them.

Jan 18, Lauren rated it liked it. I picked this book up on a whim, intrigued by the banner of text touting the words inside as one of the most famous sermons in American history.

I liked it at first. If that were the entirety of this sermon, I would like it. Unfortunately, Acres of Diamonds is the worst sort of prosperity gospel. The sermon presents a narrow view of the world, one based on, I would imagine, Mr. Conwell did significant good over the course of his own life. Jul 31, Nomi rated it it was amazing Shelves: Sometimes we forget to look in our own backyard be it for answers or for ideas to further our wealth, health, or spiritual self.

We live in a society where everything better is assigned an 'elusive' tag. Where everything better is always something we don't possess. This little book reminds us that that is not always the case.

We are taught to always weigh all our options before proceeding with a decision and too many times we only weigh 'outer' options failing to take stock of what we already po Sometimes we forget to look in our own backyard be it for answers or for ideas to further our wealth, health, or spiritual self. We are taught to always weigh all our options before proceeding with a decision and too many times we only weigh 'outer' options failing to take stock of what we already possess and how we can enhance our current inventory or current skills to receive greater returns.

Another gem this book touches on is people's attitude towards money. You won't become wealthy if you believe money to be evil. You won't become wealthy if you begrudge others for their success. Develop a healthy attitude towards money. It is not evil. Always be generous.

Opportunities are readily available, but you have to learn to not pursue one avenue of means to attain what you want.

Keep an open mind and start at home. Lastly, embrace who you are and work from there. Be a noble character and be great. Don't say you will become great when you have achieved what you wanted.

If you are not great now you can't be great then. Substitute 'great' for any other word until the message clicks for you. Charity starts at home. Mar 18, Amina rated it really liked it. Everything you want to do lies within you, all the sources and the forces are in you.. He that can give to his city any blessin Everything you want to do lies within you, all the sources and the forces are in you.. He that can give to his city any blessing, he who can be a good citizen while he lives here, he that can make better homes, he that can be a blessing whether he works in the shop or sits behind the counter or keeps house, whatever be his life, he who would be great anywhere must first be great in his own Philadelphia" Oct 09, Mario Tomic rated it it was amazing.

I'm really amazed how much wisdom this book contains, every lesson is presented with a true story and it's very easy to recognize the value in these stories. The book itself really goes hard against the very common belief people have that the grass is always greener at the other side of the fence. To read this entire book it won't take you longer than an hour and it's full of powerful concepts that can be just as easily applied today as in when this book was first published. Written by the founder of Temple University, "Acres of Diamonds" is an inspirational lecture about success.

The edition I read also included a biography of Russell Conwell and a brief autobiographical note from the author. Conwell, who presented this lecture in excess of 5, times during his life, was a Civil War officer, lawyer and pastor. His family farm was one of the stops on the Underground Railroad and he established one of the first schools that would educate African-American children.

In his presentation, Conwell talks about the importance of generosity, ideas, and finding out what needs one can fulfill as an entrepreneur. His style is flowing and eloquent, which makes it a delight to read despite some of the antiquated vernacular this book was originally published in Despite the age of the text, the ideas still hold true. Naturally, not every story is equally compelling to an au- dience, hut Conwell's drama transformed them from poor to wealthy, then exhorted them to use that "wealth" to do good works in the world outside the drama.

What audience could resist? Conwell worked his magic through sleight of hand using several carefully-selected sets of stories that subtly transformed the nature of wealth. These tensions were then released in the direction Conwell deemed most healthy.

This process was completed through the careful selection and telling of'"true" anecdotes, stories that illustrated each ratio and made the drama appear Western Journal of Speech Communication "real. The most notable element serv- ing that pinpose is Conwell himself. His life is nearly a direct reflec- tion of the dramatic tension he created in his speech.

In a sense, Con- well was "Acres of Diamonds," and delivering it allowed him to relive the struggle of his own life. One of the central tenets of the speech is that wealth is best pursued in one's own back yard. Aimless wanderers find that fortune forever escapes them. Conwell violated that advice from the first. In boyhood, he confessed, "I felt that there were great worlds for me to conquer, which I could never find in my native hills.

He went to sea for a short time, but was finally forced to return to his father's farm. Eventually, he settled down long enough to work his way through Yale. Though this was no small accomplishment, his strongest memories of those years were of the misery of being poor. Thus, although Conwell sought his fortune in the outside world, his rewards were small. In fact, some events seemed tailored to make Conwell wish he had stayed on the farm. The yoimg man was torn between the two contradictory desires of leaving and staying home.

When the Civil War began, Conwell once more became a wanderer, this time as a Union officer. It is perhaps prophetic that, on the verge of building a career, he would find himself under court martial for deser- tion. He did not flee from battle, he simply went to visit a nearby town without receiving permission. His personal aide de camp was killed attempting to keep Conwell's ceremonial sword out of enemy hands.

When Conwell learned this result of his absence, he collapsed and became dangerous- ly ill. As Conwell later told it, this event converted him to Christianity and gave him the drive to help others, because he had "two lives" to live-for himself and for his fallen comrade. Although the tale is melodramatic, it still reveals the birth of a second tension in Conwell's life, the tension between personal ambition and altruism. Despite this dramatic conversion, Conwell spent a few more years roaming the world in search oi his fortune.

He tried his hand at law, and had a brief but successful career in journalism as a roving reporter.

He was ordained soon after, and became pastor of the Grace Baptist Chiu-ch in Hiiladelphia in There he stayed, after his fashion, for the next forty-three years. Fall In the church Conwell found the perfect forum from which to pursue his seemingly contradictory goals. He had early discovered a talent for public speaking; now he could use that talent as a means to personal ends.

Delivering the speech at churches and chautauquas across the country allowed him to conciliate his twin needs for travel and security, for he could always retum to Philadelphia to see to his flock. The speech also allowed him to blend ambition and altruism. Conwell was lionized as one of the great speakers of his day and hailed as practically a saint, partly because he donated every pienny of his vast earnings to the newly built Temple University.

Conwell, at last, seemed to have put his life in order. He then dedicated it to help- ing put others' lives on what he believed was the proper road. While "Acres of Diamonds" was a mirror of Conwell's life, Conwell himself was a mirror of the lives of many other middle-class Americans of the era. Social historian Michael Kammen calls Americans "people of paradox" precisely because they have traditionally needed to balance many apparently contradictory forces that infuse their culture.

The first ten- sion arose as the vast frontiers of the continent filled with settlers. Americans traditionally valued westward movement. A peripatetic society was bom in movement from Europe and developed amidst a multitude of wanderings.

Each individual had to decide whether to leave or stay at home. Each had to worry about consequences of that decision. A second concept undergoing change was the role of wealth in the social order. The middle-class in the United States was richer than it had ever been, yet there was still discontent.

Merle Curti notes that as the nineteenth cen- tury progressed, there were fewer opportunities for such material ad- vancement, until the turn of the century marked, for all practical pur- poses, the end of the dream. This slow change set the stage for another tension "manifest in their wish to succeed, but also in their wish to change the criteria for success. Money did not matter; personal character did. Wealth was to be used to help the poor develop the internal resources they needed to succeed.

His favorite aphorism was. T o help a man to help himself is the wisest effort of human love. He pursued it through a variety of programs, such as the creation of Temple, which Western Journal of Speech Communication eventually became the model "working CIEISS" university by offering night school and vocational training.

At one level, the speech functioned as the engine that provided funding for Temple University. It was, however, much more to Conwell than a fund-raiser for Temple.

Indeed, he saw it as a further avenue through which to pursue his work. He could not directly improve the lot of all people through the university, but his speech could inspire many in- dividuals to seek their own goals. Beyond that, he desired to inspire other Christians to join him in his efforts. Thus Conwell sought to change American society for the better through the medium of the platform, an ambitious goal that he approached with great skill. It consists of one story after another, and, at first glance, these stories do appear to be pulled ran- domly from some file in the speaker's head.

The sequence begins with the apocryphal tale of one Al Hafed, a Persian who sold his farm to search for diamonds, not knowing that "acres of diamonds" lay on his own land. It then moves on to an anonymous gold seeker who sold his ranch to a Colonel Sutter. Sutter's Mill, of coiurse, eventually became the center of the California gold rush. The rest of the stories are all strict- ly American in setting, all ostensibly "true," and all aimed at forward- ing Conwell's central points: 1 It is easy to get rich in America, thus 2 everyone ought to be rich, because 3 money is power, and is therefore the best avenue through which to do one's Christian duty.

Like Al Hafed, Americans are siurounded by unrealized opportunity. There is no need to leave home to search for wealth, since careful observation of our sxu"- roundings will reveal our own individual diamond mines. Closer examination reveals, however, that the collection of "true life" anecdotes is not casuailly assembled. Conwell's tales serve as "mini dramas" that draw the audience into the larger narrative. The lesser stories are arranged so that each series reflects the symbolic transfor- mations Conwell attempts on a grand scale.

They also serve as the mediiun through which he magically creates wealth from poverty. Conwell's transformation results from the careful manipulation of pentadic elements within these stories. Burke recognizes that rhetoric is the main tool through which all such "transformations" are ac- complished. All dialectical terms, such as "wealth" versus "poverty," share a common substance that can serve as a rapprochement, since Fall Distinctions, we might say, arise out of a great central moltenness, where all is merged Let one of these crusted distinctions return to its source, and in this alchemic center it may be remade, again becoming molten liquid, and may enter into new combinations, whereat it may again be thrown forth as a new crust, a different distinction.

The five key terms of scene, act, agent, agency, and purpose are simply different attributes of any given situation.

A sjieaker creating a dramatic interpretation of such a situation may choose to emphasize certain of these terms and de-emphasize others. These rhetorical manipulations alter the overall meaning given to a particular drama.

As Biirke notes, the pentadic elements' participation in a common ground makes for transformability.

Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell

At every point where the field covered by any one of these terms overlaps upon the field covered hy any other, there is an alchemic opportunity, whereby we can put one philosophy or doctrine of motivation into the alembic, make the appropriate passes, and take out another.

His dialectical terms play upon tensions already felt by his audience, such as the balance between leaving versus staying home, wealth versus poverty, and materialism versus altruism. These tensions make his stories compelling, and lend power to his larger narrative. This process is the basis for the following analysis. He distracts the audience from the trick with a welter of detail, all the white cstsually manipulating the pentadic interpretation of these events.

Navigation menu

These manipulations come in distinct series. This ratio deals primarily with the relationship be- tween person and place. Given a certain scene, one expects to find a cer- tain type of personality abiding there. The main thrust of such an em- phasis is that the scene requires agents who are its "dialectical counter- part.

Conwell uses the ratio to create negative examples for the audience. The first story, that of Al Hafed, is apocryphal. Conwell uses it to create a setting wherein Giod and nature Eire the primary powers, as he describes the process by which diamonds are created. Conwell uses the story to claim that God sent out a ball of fire and it went rolling through the universe, burning its way through other cosmic hanks of fog, until it condensed the moisture without.

The internal flames hurst through the cooling crust and threw up the mountains If this internal melted mass hurst out and cooled very quickly it hecame granite; that which cooled less quickly became silver; and less quickly, gold; and after gold diamonds were made p. From the apocrsrphal Conwell progresses to the contemporary. He sets the scene completely, in the most concrete way possible, by directly nam- ing the sites wherein wealth had been hidden, waiting for the right pier- son to come along: the Grolconda mines in Africa, Sutter's Mill in Western Journal of Speech Communication California, Tittisville in Pennsylvania and Newburyport; Massachusetts.

Suddenly the audience sees that wealth is everywhere. Acres of diamonds lie where there was only sand. Conwell builds a world where opportunity waits for everyone. In each of these cases thus created, the "hero" of the story proves himself unworthy of the treasure. He abandons his own hack yard in favor of parts uriknown, and thereby his fortune falls into the hands of other, wiser, souls.

Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell

In the earlier stories, the hero fails through mere ignorance. Al Hafed knows nothing about diamonds, and gets bad ad- vice from a wandering priest. The man at Sutter's Mill is a rancher, not a miner. Eventually, however, ignorance becomes stupidity, or, even worse, hubris. The victims are people who should know better.

In each subsequent story, Conwell emphasizes the foolishness of the person who left home to find wealth, as in this tale of a man who sold a silver mine: [T]his professor of mines and mining and mineralogy. He was brought up there; he had gone back and forth by that piece of silver, rubhed it with his sleeve, and it seemed to say; "Come now, now, now, here is a hundred thousand dollars.

Why not take me? There was no silver in Newbiuyport; it was all away off-well, I don't know where; he didn't, but somewhere else-and he was a professor of mineralogy p. The moral is clear: a land full of opportunity requires a noble character, one who will see the wealth and grasp it with both hands. If you are the "right" kind of person, "you ought to be rich; you have no right to be poor" p.

This opening for the drama serves two pvuposes. First, it serves to explain the cause of poverty. Second, it allows Conwell to create guilt in his audience. The cause of poverty, as defined hy Conwell, is weak character. Thus, the reason not everyone is rich, despite the abundance in the world, is that many people are foolish, or lazy, or blind, or ignorant, or have some other character flaw.

This explanation is im- portant, because it allows Conwell to take the second step, that of creating guilt in the audience. Conwell wins the intellectual assent of his audience through his description of the poor.Take the time to stand off and look at your work as a stranger might and ask, Why does he do it that way? Conwell ended evening services by holding an hour of prayer, leading song services, and giving commentary relevant to his sermons.

When he saw one walk past with confident posture and a smile on her face, he took note of her bonnet. Consequently, on March 29, , a contract was negotiated to build the new church.

The story does not end here, however. The celebration continued throughout the week, and the church was filled to capacity for all of its services.